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The Alauda Aeronautics Mk3 EXA race-craft, designed in Adelaide, will take part in a race series organised by fellow Adelaide company Airspeeder.  , Picture: Supplied

Flying car races set to take off after Aussie trials

technology

A world-first, global “flying car” Grand Prix series is planned after the success of tests in the South Australian outback

Mark Knight cartoon on Big Freeze 7

Daniher gives the MND beast a shove

health

Though we are in a pandemic, the annual Big Freeze event reminds Mark Knight that there are other medical battles being fought that also deserve our attention

Draco volans, the common flying dragon on the tree in Tangkoko National Park, Sulawesi, is a species of lizard endemic to Southeast Asia. lizard in wild nature, beautiful colorful lizard

Robot lizards solve prey puzzle

animals

Why do predators sometimes overlook a seemingly easy meal in the wild? Australian scientists have answered the question with the help of robotic lizards

Latest

China’s wandering elephants become global stars

A migrating herd of elephants graze near Shuanghe Township, Jinning District of Kunming city in the Yunnan Province of southwestern China. Already famous at home, China's wandering elephants are now becoming international stars. Major global media, including satellite news stations, news papers and wire services are chronicling the herd's more-than year-long, 500 km trek from their home in a wildlife reserve in mountainous southwest Yunnan province to the outskirts of the provincial capital of Kunming. (Yunnan Forest Fire Brigade via AP
animals

After more than a year on the move, the antics of a Chinese herd of elephants are proving irresistible to social and world media

How outback oval became the ‘MCG of the Desert’

Ashley Smith, 11, and Latahnia Anderson, 10, on the newly grassed Santa Teresa Oval in the Northern Territory  on May 3, 2021.  Picture: Emma Murray
indigenous news

A footy oval has been transformed into a green grassy oasis in a remote Northern Territory town in a project led by the Melbourne Football Club

Radioactive rhino horns to the rescue?

Scientists in South Africa have injected radioactive material into the horns of two rhinos in a novel effort to save the species from poachers., James Larkin, a professor at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg and an expert in radiation protection, said that the stable isotopes used were harmless and that he “doesn’t want to kill anyone” with the infusion: “We just want to use the natural reticence towards radioactive material to decrease demand for rhino horn and also make it easier , From sourcE:, https://www.facebook.com/Rhisotope/
animals

A radical – indeed radioactive – scientific solution has begun in South Africa to save the rhino species by deterring poachers

China lifts the baby limit to three

Chinese babies accompanied by their parents take part in a baby swimming contest, which the organizer hopes to break the Guinness World Record for the most babies swimming together, at a stadium in Beijing, China, 11/09/2010. China's government maintains that the one child policy has averted 400 million births since the strict policy implemented in 1979 and has vowed to enforce it until at least 2033, when the population is expected to peak at 1.5 billion.
humanities

When China introduced the one-child policy in 1979 it was to prevent a population explosion, but now more babies are needed

Australia’s most influential Indigenous sports stars

Athlete Cathy Freeman wins gold. Cathy at Medal Presentation. PicCraig/Borrow  headshot /sydney olympic games sport olympics athletics olympic2000 sydney2000 25 Sept 2000
indigenous news

They have thrilled us on the field, track, court and in the pool, but the achievements of these Indigenous athletes go beyond sport

Teen climate warriors have their day in court

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA- News Wire photos MAY 27 2021- (LR)  Laura Kirwan (17), Izzy Raj-Seppings (14), Ava Princi (17) and Liv Heaton posing for a photo out the front of the Federal law court on Phillip st in Sydney. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Adam Yip
environment

Aussie teenage climate activists have lost their court bid to stop a NSW mine expansion, but ‘duty of care’ ruling declared a win

Why some sounds drive us crazy

naughty children
science

Researchers from Newcastle University in the UK discover a link in brain processes that could help people who can’t stand certain sounds

Get set for a very special lunar eclipse

A total eclipse of the Moon seen from Tasmania on 8 October 2014. During that eclipse, the Moon remained close to the inner edge of Earth’s shadow. On Wednesday it will be even closer. PHOTO: Martin George
explainers

The first lunar eclipse of 2021 is going to happen on May 26. This is going to be a super lunar event with a supermoon, a lunar eclipse and a red blood moon all at once. Here’s how it happens

Sharks use Earth’s magnetic field as GPS

(FILES) In this file photo taken on April 26, 2012 a Bonnethead shark swims at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, California. - The Aquarium features a collection of over 11,000 animals representing over 500 different species. It focuses on the Pacific Ocean in three major permanent galleries, sunny Southern California and Baja, the frigid waters of the Northern Pacific and the colorful reefs of the Tropical Pacific.The non-profit Aquarium sees 1.5 million visitors a year and has a total staff of over 900 people including more than 300 employees and about 650 volunteers. (Photo by JOE KLAMAR / AFP)
animals

Researchers believe migrating sharks use the Earth’s magnetic field as a sort of natural GPS to help them navigate the world’s oceans

Hank the cat worn out by mouse plague

Embargoed for Monday 17 May 2021. Amy Payten from Gulgong took this image of her 9 year old cat called Hank with a mouse sitting on it. Must Credit her daughter Holly Schink
environment

The mouse plague overrunning eastern Australia has tormented those in its path for so long even a usually energetic ginger cat called Hank no longer bothers to chase the pesky rodents

Charlotte still queen of the playground

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - NewsWire Photos May 12, 2021: The stats on the most popular baby names are in ... for girls, Charlotte has come in at the top spot for the 8th time in 10 years and Oliver is the most popular boys' name. Picture of baby Charlotte, 5 months (wearing a bow), and Oliver, 7 months. Picture: NCA NewsWire/Naomi Jellicoe
just for fun

The 2021 Baby Names Report is out, which analyses trends over the past decade. For the eighth time in 10 years, Charlotte is the top girls’ name with Oliver also consistently number one for boys

Sniffer bees busy on COVID test training

Enjoy the spring! Everything is blooming and the bees are diligently flying from flower to flower. I would like to share this spring feelings with you and have taken this picture for you.
science

Scientists have trained bees to identify COVID-19 in test samples, providing results almost instantly instead of waiting hours for regular test results to come through

Found: early explorer’s lost marker tree

One of the other trees carved by the Wells expedition
history

Researchers have used modern technology to find a carved marker tree used by explorers during an 1891 expedition in the South Australia outback

Why pranks can be good for you

Why pranking could be good for the soul (without going too far). Lifestyle and playful photos of Emily, her husband and their two kids in the yard with pranking props (rubber snakes/spiders). Colourful and casual clothing, eyes to camera shots for SMARTdaily cover photo.    Cassie, 10, and Jake, 8, in their room. Picture: Alex Coppel.
just for fun

Playing tricks can relieve stress and raise a smile – and kids who share their funniest prank could end up with a character named after them in the next Funny Kid book!

Some good news for endangered Sumatran rhino

SUNDAY ESCAPE. WILDLIFE WISHLIST. Sumatran rhino. Picture: Taronga Conservation Society Australia
animals

With only an estimated 80 Sumatran rhinos left in the wild, the results of a new study deliver welcome hope for the survival of the species.

Creepy-crawlies on the menu

Edible insects are high in protein, vitamins and other macronutrients.  For spread of bread, desserts etc. (Image: Boris Ceko)
health

Bugs like witchetty grubs, bogong moths and green tree ants could soon be on Australian dinner plates under a plan to grow our edible insect industry

Farewell Michael Collins, Apollo 11 astronaut

(FILES) This file NASA handout portrait taken in July 1969 shows US astronaut Michael Collins, part of the Apollo 11 where he served as the command module pilot. - American astronaut Michael Collins, who flew the Apollo 11 command module while his crewmates became the first people to land on the Moon in 1969, died on April 28, 2021 after battling cancer, his family said. "Mike always faced the challenges of life with grace and humility, and faced this, his final challenge, in the same way," Collins' family tweeted on his official Twitter account. (Photo by Handout / NASA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /NASA/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
history

US astronaut Michael Collins, who piloted the Apollo 11 command module while Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first people to walk on the Moon, has died aged 90

Just three per cent of Earth untouched by humans

ESCAPE: Toucan, Peru - uniworld, peru, amazon, rainforest, nature, wildlife, animals, toucan, Bird. Picture: Uniworld
environment

A new scientific study has found as little as 3 per cent of the world’s land surfaces are still home to their full range of native species and remain unspoilt by human activity

Quick decision by ScoMo not a surprise to cartoonist

Mark Knight's cartoon on India flight ban
news

Visual metaphors can help illustrate complex political situations. With air travel to India ceasing suddenly due to the coronavirus disaster there, Mark Knight needed an aviation metaphor

Group spends 40 days in French cave for experiment

Members of the French team that participated in the "Deep Time" study pose for a photo after exiting the Lombrives Cave in Ussat les Bains, France, Saturday, April 24, 2021. After 40 days in voluntary isolation, 15 people participating in a scientific experiment have emerged from a vast cave in southwestern France. Eight men and seven women lived in the dark, damp depths of the Lombrives cave in the Pyrenees to help researchers understand how people adapt to drastic changes in living conditions and environments. They had no clocks, no sunlight and no contact with the world above. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
science

Imagine 40 days in a cave without light, clocks or technology. That’s what a group of 15 volunteers has done for a scientific experiment in France

Game on for girls’ cricket, footy and basketball

Girls Sport. Analysis of some five million community sport participation rates that show girls aged five to 14 were joining sports traditionally dominated by males, such as basketball, AFL and cricket, pre-COVID in greater numbers than ever before. Basketballers L-R Arden 11, Melody 11, Lia Green 11, front L-R Jazmin 12 and Stephanie 11 at Eagle Stadium Werribee. Picture Rebecca Michael
sport

A study of Australian sporting participation records shows an increase in the number of girls playing club sports traditionally played by boys, but fewer boys aged 5-14 are playing sport

How murderball relit Shae Graham’s Olympic flame

TOKYO, JAPAN - OCTOBER 18: Shae Graham of Australia in action during the match between United States of America and Australia  on day three of the World Wheelchair Rugby Challenge at the Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium on October 18, 2019 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Moto Yoshimura/Getty Images)
sport

The first female in Australia’s wheelchair rugby team hopes to compete at the Tokyo Paralympics and fulfil her childhood dream

Billions of T-rex roamed the Earth

Chris Pratt faces a rampaging T-Rex dinosaur in a scene from film Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
animals

If it scares you to think about one bus-sized T-rex rampaging across the land, what about 2.5 billion of them? New tyrannosaur research has suggested there were 20,000 alive at a time during their reign

Kids quizzed by app to gain phone access

Alyssa Elnekave, 13, using the new app 1Question, at home in Rozelle, today.
Her parents, Ann and Issac Elnekave, have invented an app called 1Question and
1Questian Parent.
The app forces kids to answer maths questions to unlock apps and games on their phones. 
Picture:Justin Lloyd
technology

Two Australian parents have invented an app that asks kids a maths or English problem before they can unlock their phones.

Crayola launches inclusive crayons

Child drawing top view. Artwork workplace with creative accessories. Flat lay art tools for painting.
humanities

Crayola has teamed up with MAC Cosmetics to create a range of racially inclusive crayons, pencils and textas.

Author inspired by family’s Holocaust story

Book cover - Heroes of the Secret Underground by Susanne Gervay. For Kids News book club
book club

Time is running out to get your questions in for author Susanne Gervay. You can also read a preview of her novel, Heroes of the Secret Underground, our April Book Club read

Mars helicopter takes off on first flight

This NASA photo was taken after the first flight of NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter — and the first powered, controlled flight on another planet,  captured by Mastcam-Z, a pair of zoomable cameras aboard NASA's Perseverance Mars rover, on April 19, 2021. - Flying in a controlled manner on Mars is far more difficult than flying on Earth. Mars has significant gravity (about one-third that of Earth's), but its atmosphere is just 1 percent as dense as Earth's at the surface. Stitched together from multiple images, the mosaic is not white balanced; instead, it is displayed in a preliminary calibrated version of a natural color composite, approximately simulating the colors of the scene that we would see if we were there viewing it ourselves. (Photo by Handout / NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/ASU / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/ASU/HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

NASA’s experimental helicopter Ingenuity rose into the thin air above the dusty red surface of Mars on Monday, achieving the first powered flight by an aircraft on another planet

Robot Sophia’s artwork sells for $900,000

Sophia has created a digital artwork. Picture: AP
arts

Artwork created by a robot called Sophia has sold at auction for an amount equivalent to more than $900,000, paid in the form of a non-fungible token, or NFT

Hi-tech mouthguards to help tackle concussion

Footy kids Harper Mai, 8 and Jonah Mai, 10, show off the new mouth guards. Picture: Jake Nowakowski.
health

Junior footballers could soon be wearing new hi-tech mouthguards fitted with data chips to monitor head knocks and concussions

Australia’s women’s cricket team triumph again

TAURANGA, NEW ZEALAND - APRIL 04: Megan Schutt of Australia (C) is congratulated on bowling out Hayley Jensen of New Zealand during game one of the ODI Series between New Zealand and Australia at Bay Oval on April 04, 2021 in Tauranga, New Zealand. (Photo by Dave Rowland/Getty Images)
sport

Our women cricketers have achieved a level of excellence that places them at least alongside famous sporting teams such as the Invincibles. But are they the best of the best?

Captain Underpants author sorry for spin-off book

Captain Underpants and the Sensational Saga of Sir Stinks-A-Lot by
 Dav Pilkey
humanities

A graphic novel spin-off of the Captain Underpants series is being pulled from libraries and bookstores after its publisher and author apologise

Supermoon helps free stuck ship

A picture released by Egypt's Suez Canal Authority on March 29, 2021, shows a man waving the Egyptian flag after Panama-flagged MV 'Ever Given' container ship was fully dislodged from the banks of the Suez. - The ship was refloated and the Suez Canal reopened, sparking relief almost a week after the huge container ship got stuck and blocked a major artery for global trade. Salvage crews have been working around the clock ever since the accident which has been blamed on high winds and poor visibility during a sandstorm. (Photo by - / SUEZ CANAL AUTHORITY / AFP)
geography

The stars, sun, Earth and moon all aligned in Egypt this week, with the year’s first supermoon bringing the high tide needed to shift the massive ship blocking the Suez Canal

Sydney Swans change their song

Swans players sing their team song in the rooms after winning AFL match between the Sydney Swans and St.Kilda Saints at the SCG. Picture. Phil Hillyard
sport

AFL team the Sydney Swans have announced a more inclusive team song – part of a growing movement that includes the recent change to Australia’s national anthem

Teaching honeyeaters to sing the right song

A regent honeyeater. Picture: Douglas Gimesy
animals

Male songbirds usually learn their tunes from adult mentors, but when young birds lack proper role models, they hit all the wrong notes — and have less success attracting mates

Cyber bullies still a big problem for kids

Tired Boy Studying In Bedroom
safe kids

One in two young people say they have been the target of cyber bullying with a quarter threatened with harm, according to new research that suggests the situation isn’t improving

Being fed to the Tigers at the home of footy

Mark Knight's cartoon for the return of AFL to the MCG. Picture: Mark Knight
sport

Cartoonist Mark Knight celebrates the return of AFL to Victoria and the MCG and draws comparisons with the gladiatorial battles of Ancient Rome

Young Australians not getting enough sleep

Why sleep is important - Ask Healthy Harold on Kids News. iStock image
health

New research reveals young generations of Australians have reported poor sleep quality during COVID-19

Digital artwork snapped up for $90 million

CORRECTION / This undated handout image obtained March 10, 2021, courtesy of Christie's shows a digital art collage by Beeple, for sale in New York. - The digital collage by the American artist Beeple, also known as Mike Winkelmann, a pioneer of the exploding virtual art market, sold for a record $69.3 million, Christie's announced on March 11, 2021. "Everydays: The First 5,000 Days" is now the most expensive NFT -- non-fungible token, or collectible digital asset transformed using blockchain into something ownable -- ever sold. (Photo by Handout / CHRISTIE'S AUCTION HOUSE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /CHRISTIE'S AUCTION HOUSE/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS / “The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by Handout has been modified in AFP systems in the following manner: [American artist Beeple, also known as Mike Winkelmann] instead of [American artist Beeple, also known as Scott Winkelmann]. Please immediately remove the erroneous mention[s] from all your online services and delete it (them) from your servers. If you have been authorized by AFP to distribute it (them) to third parties, please ensure that the same actions are carried out by them. Failure to promptly comply with these instructions will entail liability on your part for any continued or post notification usage. Therefore we thank you very much for all your attention and prompt action. We are sorry for the inconvenience this notification may cause and remain at your disposal for any further information you may require.”
arts

A digital collage by an artist named Beeple has sold for a record price far higher than that paid for traditional works by many well known artists

American city turns off lights to save birds

PHILADELPHIA ..  for John Huxley story  ..   the city skyline with the Ben Franklin Bridge over the Delaware River
animals

A group in the US city of Philadelphia has started Lights Out Philly to try to reduce the number of confused birds dying during migration

Super speller backs PM’s Spelling Bee

SMART: PM'S SPELLING BEE. Akash Vukoti , now 11, made history as the youngest ever competitor in the Scripps National Spelling Bee in the US and has thrown his support behind the Prime Minister's Spelling Bee in Australia.
A child prodigy inducted into American Mensa aged three, he has since become a household name in the US, with TV appearances  including Dancing with the Stars and Little Big Shots. Akash has over 250,000 subscribers on his YouTube channel. Akash is pictured at home in Texas. Picture: supplied.
spelling bee

US spelling whiz and YouTube star Akash Vukoti has some advice for students sitting the Prime Minister’s Spelling Bee from today and those still planning to sign up before registrations close on March 24

‘Cute and weird’ sea slugs lose their heads

This undated photo provided by Sayaka Mitoh shows a Elysia cf. marginata sea slug after autotomy. According to a study released in the journal Current Biology on Monday, March 8, 2021, scientists have discovered that some Japanese sea slugs can grow whole new bodies if their heads are cut off, taking regeneration to the most extreme levels ever seen. (Sayaka Mitoh via AP)
animals

In an extreme case of autotomy, Japanese sea slugs have been found to regrow new bodies after decapitating themselves, which could help us better understand human regeneration

Anzac Day marches get the green light from PM

09/03/2021 96-year-old WW2 veteran Nevin Phillips with his grand daughter Lauren at the Shrine of Remembrance in Melbounre. Aaron Francis/The Australian
civics

Prime Minister Scott Morrison says if Australians can gather to party and protest, they should also come together on Anzac Day to remember and respect our veterans

Food waste a growing problem

10/9/14. Pooraka Primary School has installed brightly-coloured ibis-proof bins to stop the birds stealing rubbish and making a mess at the school - Elliott Waters - 9yrs (Walkley Heights) and Shayla Holloway - 7yrs (Clearview)
 Pic Keryn Stevens
environment

Will any of the food in your lunch box end up in the bin today? If so, you could be contributing to a 931 million ton global food waste problem

Australia’s incredible women of influence

Australian Open tennis. 17/02/2021. Day 10.. Ash Barty vs Karolina Muchova on Rod Laver Arena.  Ash Barty during her 3 set loss    . Pic: Michael Klein
humanities

March 8 is International Women’s Day, a day of celebration when all women are recognised for their achievements. Kids News profiles 10 incredible Australian women of influence

‘Hurtful’ Dr Seuss books will no longer be printed

Embargoed until Sunday Feb 7 for The Sunday Papers ONLY:  Kids with Dr Suess books for Sunday Herald Sun giveaway. Chloe Sherar (6).
Picture Jay Town.
humanities

Six Dr Seuss books that ‘portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong’ will no longer be printed as part of a commitment to represent and support all communities and families

No shortcuts for Sir Tom, a hero of the pandemic

Mark Knight cartoon on funeral of Sir Tom Moore
humanities

While editorial cartoons are generally designed to give their readers a laugh (usually at a politician’s expense), it’s not always the case. Mark Knight pays tribute to Captain Sir Tom Moore

Aussie teens fight Government over climate change

Melbourne teen Anjali "Anj" Sharma, 16, is leading a class action lawsuit by eight Australian teens challenging the Federal Minister for the Environment, Susan Ley, to protect young people from climate change. Picture: Jake Nowakowski
civics

Melbourne teen Anjali Sharma is leading a landmark Federal Court class action lawsuit by eight young Australians to stop projects like the proposed Vickery coal mine extension in NSW

Breakthrough in dating our oldest rock art

A two-metre-long painting of a kangaroo in Western Australia’s Kimberley region has been identified as Australia’s oldest intact rock painting. 

Traditional owner, Ian Waina, recording the 17,300 year old painting of a kangaroo. Peter Veth, Balanggarra Aboriginal Corporation
arts

Australia’s oldest painting has been identified as a kangaroo-like image created more than 17,000 years ago in the Kimberley region of WA, a big step forward in creating an accurate art timeline

Video games may help boys bond, study finds

(L-R) Imogen (18) and brother Brady (11) say gaming has helped them stay in touch with friends during covid. Boys aged 11 who play video games are 24 per cent less likely to be depressed than non gamers three years later. More of a worry is the time girls spend on social media sites such as Snapchat and TikTok, because it can make them feel depressed. Picture: Josie Hayden
technology

Boys who aren’t active are not harmed by playing video games, a new study has found. More of a concern is the time girls spend on social media sites such as Snapchat and TikTok

Look out for fruit fly after La Nina summer

18/2/21. More than 1000 residents in Prospect and Stepney are being told to strip ripe fruit off their trees, to help stop the spread of fruit fly. PIRSA biosecurity officers in orange overalls are door-knocking offering residents assistance with the task - Joshua Dowsett and Saurin Barot   
Picture: Keryn Stevens
weather

Kids are banned from taking fruit to school and residents are being urged to strip their trees of fruit in two suburbs of Adelaide that are the latest locations battling fruit fly outbreaks

Ditch digital for chalk, says learning expert

Coco, 6, write with chalk. Qld academic wants schools to get back teaching with chalk and slates. He says it's good for fine motor skills they are missing out on with screens. Picture: Tim Carrafa
technology

Primary school kids should ditch digital and return to using chalk and slates to help develop the brain, motor skills and the ability to construct a story, a leading education expert says

How does the coronavirus vaccine work?

Concept for the worldwide delivery of COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine by plane.
explainers

The first Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine doses have arrived in Australia and the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine now has approval to be used in Australia too. Kids News looks at how vaccines work

Bushfire Poetry Comp: smoky skies, burnt leaves

Daily Telegraph. An out of control bushfire threatens Johns River on the NSW mid north coast.    Picture Nathan Edwards.
arts

It’s the last week to get your Kids News Bushfire Poetry Competition entry in. Looking for some inspiration? Read 12-year-old Kirra Dangerfield’s poem, “The ash black land”

A billion years on Earth in 40 seconds

University of Adelaide Professor Alan Collins from the Tectonics & Earth Systems Research Group in the Department of Earth Sciences. Supplied.
geography

University of Adelaide scientists have released a video that, for the first time, shows the movement of the Earth’s tectonic plates over the past billion years

More girls to become STEM stars of the future

Secondary school students Hita Keshav, 15, Caitlyn Lewis, 17 and Emily Pham, 16 in the lab at Monash Science School. GIRLS are still underrepresented in STEM subjects despite major investments in recent years to boost pathways. It comes as Thursday marks the annual International Day of Women and Girls in Science. Female students at John Monash Science School, in Clayton, are celebrating the day by attending a virtual event hosted by the Royal Women's Hospital. More than 4000 students across Victoria will be involved in the event, which will see researchers and scientists give insights about their jobs. Picture: Jake Nowakowski
science

Despite still being outnumbered by males, more girls and women are starting careers in science than ever before, now making up 42.6 per cent of the workforce in STEM areas

Kids set sail on adventure of a lifetime

FEBRUARY 4TH 2021: Erin and Dave Carey
with their kids Hamish (11), Jack (10) and Christian (6) are planning on travelling around the world on a Yacht. Photographer at North Haven. Picture: Kelly Barnes
geography

Three Australian children are ditching regular life on land to sail the Atlantic Ocean on a yacht with their parents ‘for as long as it’s fun’, which could mean two, five or even 10 years at sea

Humans have made the oceans very noisy

The Queen Mary 2 (QM2) arrives at Port Everglades in Florida on her maiden voyage 26 Jan 2004, as tug boats shoot water cannons to celebrate her arrival. AFP picRobert/Sullivan cruise liner ship ships shipping
environment

With rumbling ships, hammering oil drills and other big noises, humans have completely altered the underwater soundscape, in some cases deafening or disorienting whales and other animals

How to tell if your dog is a genius

Funny portrait of cute smilling puppy dog border collie on couch. New lovely member of family little dog at home gazing and waiting. Pet care and animals concept
animals

An experiment that’s easy to try at home has shown “talented” dogs are able to learn the name of a new object after hearing it four times, an ability previously thought to be confined to humans

Farewell Sir Tom, inspiration to millions

British World War II veteran Captain Sir Tom Moore, who raised over £32 million for the NHS during the Coronavirus pandemic, has died after being diagnosed with Covid-19. MARSTON MORETAINE, ENGLAND - In this handout image provided by Capture the Light Photography, Colonel Tom Moore and his daughter Hannah celebrate his 100th birthday, with an RAF flypast provided by a Spitfire and a Hurricane over his home on April 30, 2020 in Marston Moretaine, England. Colonel Moore, formerly a Captain, received a promotion in honour of his 100th birthday and in recognition of the funds, in excess of £29m, he raised for the NHS by walking laps of his garden. (Emma Sohl - Capture the Light Photography via Getty Images)
humanities

Captain Sir Tom Moore, the UK World War II veteran who walked up and down his garden to raise money for health care workers, has died after testing positive for COVID-19. He was 100

Clever solution to massive mask waste problem

A man wearing a face mask walks past a sign advertising masks in Melbourne on July 20, 2020. - Australia's second-biggest city will make it compulsory to wear a mask in public, authorities announced on July 19, as Melbourne steps up efforts to bring a coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by William WEST / AFP)
environment

Millions of disposable masks used and discarded during the pandemic could be recycled and enshrined forever into the country’s roads, Australian scientists have revealed

Experts say pens and pencils rule at school

L to R, Isobel 4yrs, Ariah 4yrs, Thomas 4yrs, Zaira 4yrs, Murdoch University's Dr Anabela Malpique urged parents to pivot away from phones and to old school pencils and paper to boost memory, hand eye coordination and fine motor schools, St Paul's Bald Hills, Monday February 1st 2021 - Photo Steve Pohlner
technology

Handwriting is more important than typing on a keyboard for kids’ literacy development in the first years of school, according to a handwriting expert

Robots to the rescue for kids too sick for class

Ethan Waller schooling from his home in Sandgate with The Lakes College students Lachlan Aitken and Ashleigh Stevens, Wednesday, January 27, 2021 - Picture: Richard Walker
health

A telepresence robot nicknamed robo-ethan is helping Ethan Waller attend class virtually and keep connected with his classmates while he can’t be at school in person

Scientists get to the bottom of wombat poo mystery

Baby Wombat. Coco's baby at Ballarat Wildlife Park. Coco, the 12-year-old common wombat is an exceptional mother, having just produced her third baby something very rare in captive wombats. The joey has just started exploring her new home at Ballarat Wildlife Park but never venturing too far from mum. Head curator, Julia Leonard, believes the little Joey is around 7 months old and is looking forward to baby spending more time out of the pouch. Proud parents Coco and Banjo. The park is having a naming competition for the joey and can be entered by going to www.wildlifepark.com.au
animals

The mystery behind wombats’ unique cube-shaped poo has been solved after an accidental discovery by scientists

Dinosaur could be the biggest ever land animal

Handout picture released on January 20, 2021 by the CTyS-UNLaM Science Outreach Agency showing palaeontologists during an excavation in which 98 million-year-old fossils were found, at the Candeleros Formation in the Neuquen River Valley in southwest Argentina. - Scientists have unearthed massive, 98-million-year-old fossils in southwest Argentina they say may have belonged to the largest dinosaur ever discovered. Human-sized pieces of fossilized bone belonging to the giant sauropod appear to be 10-20 percent larger than those attributed to Patagotitan mayorum, the biggest dinosaur ever identified, according to a statement Wednesday from the National University of La Matanza's CTYS scientific agency. (Photo by JOSE LUIS CARBALLIDO / CTyS-UNLaM / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT AFP PHOTO / CTyS-UNLaM / JOSE LUIS CARBALLIDO - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS -DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
animals

Palaeontologists are digging up the massive 98-million-year-old fossilised skeleton of a titanosaur they now believe was the largest animal ever to walk on Earth

Bushfire Poetry Comp: author Jackie French’s five rules for writing a poem

Children's author Jackie French., Picture: Kelly Sturgis, For Kids News
arts

Award-winning author Jackie French wants kids to discover the healing power of poetry. See her tips for writing a great poem

New name revealed for Coon cheese

Story on revealing the new name of Coon cheese. Five year-olds, Charlotte and Matisse who love a good cheese toastie, no matter what itÕs called.                Picture: David Caird
civics

Favourite Australian cheese brand Coon will be renamed Cheer after concerns the old name has a racist meaning

Hope from ‘extinct’ species rediscovered

his photos taken on Thursday, March 12, 2020 and provide by the Staatliche Naturwissenschftliche Sammlung Bayerns, SNSB, shows a Voeltzkow-Chameleon in Madagascar. Scientists say they have found an elusive chameleon species that was last spotted in Madagascar 100 years ago. Researchers from Madagascar and Germany said that they discovered several living specimens of Voeltzkow's chameleon during an expedition to the northwest of the African island nation. (SNSB/Frank Glaw via AP)
animals

Earth is going through its sixth mass extinction event but there are moments of hope when species such as Voeltzkow’s chameleon, once thought to have been lost forever, are found alive

Student solves poem clues, finds treasure chest

CORRECTS CREDIT TO ADDISON DOTY - This undated photo provided by Forrest Fenn shows a chest purported to contain gold dust, hundreds of rare gold coins, gold nuggets and other artifacts.  For more than a decade, the 82-year-old claims he has packed and repacked the treasure chest, before burying it in the mountains somewhere north of Santa Fe. (AP Photo/Addison Doty)
just for fun

The identity has been revealed of the person who solved clues written into a poem, then found a famous gold-filled treasure chest hidden more than a decade ago in the wilds of Wyoming

New height agreed for Mount Everest

(FILES) This file photo taken on February 7, 2020 from a commercial aircraft shows an aerial view of Mount Everest (C) and the Himalayan mountain range, some 140kms (87 miles) north-east of Kathmandu. - The highest point on Earth got a bit higher on December 8 as China and Nepal finally agreed on a precise elevation for Mount Everest after decades of debate. The agreed height unveiled at a joint news conference in Kathmandu of 8,848.86 metres (29,031 feet) was 86 centimetres (2.8 feet) higher than the measurement previously recognised by Nepal, and more than four metres above China's official figure. (Photo by Jewel SAMAD / AFP)
mathematics

China and Nepal jointly announced a new and slightly higher official height of 8848.86m for Mount Everest on Tuesday, ending a disagreement between the two nations

Great Barrier Reef spawning shown on TV

Acropora tenuis colony of coral spawning on Great Barrier Reef during first day of summer 01/12/96. 
Queensland / Travel
environment

In an Australian first, the annual Great Barrier Reef spawning has been shown live on TV in the hope the event will bring the country together in awe and inspire people to help protect the reef

Snapshots capture happy quokkas

‘Happiness always looks small while you hold it in your hands, but let it go, and you learn at once how big and precious it is’
MAXIM GORKY


Quokkas are the happiest creatures on Earth, according to Aussie animal photographer Alex Cearns.
animals

Quokkas are the happiest creatures on Earth, according to animal photographer Alex Cearns, who has captured the loveable marsupials on camera for a new picture book.

Aussie telescope maps new atlas of the Universe

ASKAP telescope
space

In under two weeks the CSIRO’s world-leading radio telescope in Western Australia has created a Google Maps-like atlas or map of our Universe, in the meantime discovering many new galaxies

China launches mission to the Moon

A Long March 5 rocket carrying China's Chang'e-5 lunar probe launches from the Wenchang Space Center on China's southern Hainan Island on November 24, 2020, on a mission to bring back lunar rocks, the first attempt by any nation to retrieve samples from the moon in four decades. - China on Tuesday launched an unmanned spacecraft to bring back lunar rocks -- the first attempt by any nation to retrieve samples from the Moon in four decades. A Long March 5 rocket carrying the Chang'e-5 probe, named after the mythical Chinese moon goddess, blasted off from the Wenchang Space Center on the southern island province of Hainan at 4:30 am (2030 GMT Monday), the official Xinhua news agency reported. (Photo by STR / AFP) / China OUT
space

China has launched a spacecraft to collect rocks from the Moon for the first time in more than 40 years. It’s the country’s boldest space mission yet and could lead to a future crewed lunar landing

Dogs then cats top list of favourite pets

Owning a pet has many health benefits for kids. iStock image. For Kids News Hibernation
humanities

Australians love pets and our favourite pets are definitely dogs, according to the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey, which, for the first time, asked us about animals

Like Superman: Aussies making diamonds in minutes

Xingshuo Huang with a sample of laboratory made diamond (Image: Jamie Kidston/ANU).
science

In nature, diamonds take billions of years, heat and pressure to form. Australian scientists have made diamonds at room temperature by squashing carbon with the weight of 640 elephants

Solving the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle

The Bermuda Triangle is said to have claimed more than 1000 lives over the past 100 years.
explainers

Ships and planes have disappeared without a trace in the Bermuda Triangle. But is there really anything strange going on? Kids News looks at the history of this fascinating phenomenon

Room to improve Australia’s recycling efforts

Activist taking care of environment during sorting paper waste to proper recycling bin on terrace
environment

Australia is burying 67 million tonnes of garbage every year, equal to 2700kg for each person, a new report has found. That’s despite people saying they’re putting a lot of effort into recycling

‘Iso’ declared Australia’s word of the year

A woman walks past a sign urging people to stay home in Melbourne on August 14, 2020 as the city battles an outbreak of the COVID-19 coronavirus. - The state remains effectively sealed off from the rest of the country, with other regions so far largely spared from new infections. (Photo by William WEST / AFP)
humanities

The Australian National Dictionary Centre has named ‘iso’ — slang for self-isolation — as the word of 2020 from both a year and a shortlist of words dominated by the coronavirus pandemic

New names for Red Skins and Chicos lollies

Nestle has announced the new names for two of its popular lolly products. Red Skins will be known as Red Ripper and Chicos will become Cheekies.  Picture: Supplied via NCA NewsWire
civics

Red Skins will be renamed Red Ripper and Chicos will become Cheekies as Nestle scraps the old names over fears they are offensive

New technology beams sound into your head

Hearing test showing ear of young woman with sound waves simulation technology - isolated on white banner
technology

Audio technology to be unveiled this week beams music, games or movie soundtracks directly into your head without headphones or wires, which the developers are calling “sound beaming”

A Clock of Stars author Francesca Gibbons answers your questions

A Clock of Stars by Francesca Gibbons. For Kids News book club October 2020.
book club

Thanks to everyone who sent in questions for Francesca Gibbons. Check out her answers to her favourite questions, and while you’re at it you can read the first three chapters of A Clock of Stars: The Shadow Moth for free

Meet your two-million-year-old ‘cousin’

Angi and Jesse with DNH 155. Picture: supplied
history

Australian researchers have found the skull of a big-toothed, small-brained ‘cousin’ of our species called Paranthropus robustus, which could help us understand human evolution

New push to change Australian anthem lyrics

BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA - NOVEMBER 07: The Wallabies players embrace during the playing of the Australian National Anthem before the 2020 Tri-Nations match between the Australian Wallabies and the New Zealand All Blacks at Suncorp Stadium on November 07, 2020 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Bradley Kanaris/Getty Images)
civics

The NSW Premier has called for a change to the lyrics of the national anthem to better acknowledge Australia’s proud Indigenous history but some say it’s not enough of a change

Vaccine maker ‘near ecstatic’ after study result

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: People walk by the Pfizer headquarters on November 9, 2020 in New York City. Pharmaceutical company Pfizer announced positive early results on its COVID-19 vaccine trial and has proven to be 90% effective in preventing infection of the virus.   David Dee Delgado/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
health

The Pfizer coronavirus vaccine has shown a 90 per cent effectiveness rate in tests, boosting global confidence. Australia last week ordered 10 million doses of this particular vaccine

Aussie kids need less homework, more play

Single confused student studying reading notes sitting in a bar stressed high school kids . Picture: istock
health

Homework headaches and “competitive parenting’’ are fuelling kids’ anxiety, Australia’s new National Children’s Commissioner warned, calling for kids to get more time to relax and play

Gut bacteria could help control allergies, asthma

Yvonne Michaels and her two daughters (Giselle – 10 years old, Chloe – 7 years old) takes a holistic approach to managing her and their asthma.
Picture by Wayne Taylor 27th October 2020
health

There are positive signs in new research that hay fever, asthma, eczema and other allergies — which affect one in three Australians — could be controlled by improving your gut health

Plentiful water found on surface of Moon

(FILES) This file photo taken on December 14, 2016 shows a supermoon rising above central London.   According to recent studies published on July 24, 2017 in the magazine Nature Geoscience, the depth of the moon would be containing water.  / AFP PHOTO / Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS
space

NASA has announced the discovery of surface water on the Moon in more places and in larger quantities than expected, providing drinking water and rocket fuel for future astronaut base camps

What is dyslexia? Is there a cure?

Composition with books on the table.
explainers

Dyslexia is the most common cause of reading, writing and spelling difficulties. But the good news is dyslexia is not a disease and you can have dyslexia and be really good at lots of things

Phones and watches are an increasingly popular way to pay

The rise of the digital wallet. For Kids News. iStock image
money

We all know you don’t need cash to go shopping these days. But now you don’t even need a bank card, with the rise of digital wallets on smart devices

Lessons from a beetle’s almost unbreakable shell

This 2016 photo provided by the University of California, Irvine, shows a diabolical ironclad beetle, which can withstand being crushed by forces almost 40,000 times its body weight and are native to desert habitats in Southern California. Scientists say the armor of the seemingly indestructible beetle could offer clues for designing stronger planes and buildings. In a study published Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020, in the journal Nature, a group of scientists explains why the beetle is so squash-resistant. (Jesus Rivera, Kisailus Biomimetics and Nanostructured Materials Lab, University of California Irvine via AP)
science

Engineers hope to learn how to design stronger planes and buildings by studying a beetle that can withstand bird pecks, animal stomps and even being rolled over by a Toyota Camry car

Signal troubles on Earth? Move to the Moon

Artist's illustration of Artemis astronauts working on the Moon. Picture: NASA
technology

If you’re struggling with dodgy phone or internet, there’s a chance you’ll soon be better off on the Moon as NASA awards Nokia the job of building the first lunar mobile network

NASA attempts to snatch asteroid rubble

An artist's impression of the Osiris-REX spacecraft near the asteroid Bennu.  CREDIT: NASA
space

UPDATED After almost two years circling the asteroid Bennu hundreds of millions of kilometres away, a NASA spacecraft has attempted to collect a sample from the treacherous, boulder-packed surface

Kurt the cloned horse kicking up his heels

This Sept. 1, 2020 photo provided by San Diego Zoo Global shows Kurt, a tiny horse who is actually a clone. Little Kurt looks like any other baby horse as he frolics playfully in his pen. But the 2-month-old, dun-colored colt was created by fusing cells taken from an endangered Przewalski's horse at the San Diego Zoo in 1980. The cells were infused with an egg from a domestic horse that gave birth to Kurt two months ago. The baby boy was named for Kurt Benirschke, a founder of the San Diego Zoo's Frozen Zoo, where thousands of cell cultures are stored. Scientists hope he'll help restore the Przewalski's population, which numbers only about 2,000. (Christine Simmons/San Diego Zoo Global via AP)
science

In a world first, scientists have cloned a rare, endangered Przewalski’s horse. They used cells taken from a stallion 40 years ago and fused them with an egg from a domestic horse

Record fast flight to International Space Station

This NASA handout photo shows Expedition 64 NASA astronaut Kate Rubins seen as she has her Russian Sokol suit pressure checked as she and fellow crewmates Sergey Kud-Sverchkov and Sergey Ryzhikov of Roscosmos prepare for their Soyuz launch to the International Space Station on October 14, 2020, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. - The trio launched at 1:45 a.m. EDT to begin a six-month mission aboard the International Space Station. (Photo by Andrey SHELEPIN / NASA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /NASA/GCTC/ANDREY SHELEPIN/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

A new crew has arrived at the International Space Station in less time than it takes to catch a plane flight from one side of Australia to the other

Wanting the Premier to hit the right target

Mark Knight cartoon for Monday 12th of October 2020 Herald Sun Newspaper .
arts

There are lots of complex numbers in news about the coronavirus pandemic. Mark Knight explains how he created a drawing to show what’s happening in Victoria in a simple way

The planets better suited for life than Earth

An artist’s impression of the ARIEL spacecraft as it heads toward its operational position in 2028. CREDIT: ESA/STFC RAL Space/UCL/Europlanet-Science Office
space

Scientists have discovered 24 “superhabitable” planets that are older, larger, warmer and wetter than Earth, making them ideal for life

How do birds fly? Why can’t humans fly?

Taronga Zoo keepers are training one of their wedge tail eagles 'Reggie' at Athol Hall to be part of the Free Flight Bird Show. Picture: Toby Zerna
explainers

It’s spring and that means there are soon to be a lot of baby birds learning to fly. They look awkward first go, but they soon work it out. How do they do it? And why can’t humans fly too?