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Guinness World Records 2022 - Zaila Avant-garde - Most bounce juggles in on minute, most bounces in 30 seconds and most basketballs dribbled at once

The amazing kids setting world records

just for fun

From the youngest magazine editor to a basketball and spelling prodigy, the Guinness World Records 2022 edition showcases some of the globe’s most amazing young people

More than 140 aquarium-bred baby White’s seahorses were released into the wild at two Sydney Harbour locations on September 9, 2021, as part of a SEA LIFE Sydney Aquarium conservation breeding program to restore wild populations.

Baby seahorses check in to harbour hotels

animals

Special underwater “hotels” have welcomed more than 140 new guests as part of a project to boost wild populations of White’s seahorses in Sydney Harbour

An illustration of a family of Woolly Mammoths grazing on what is left of the grasses as winter approaches in this ice age scene.

Bold plan to bring woolly mammoths back to life

animals

Scientists have announced an ambitious plan to bring woolly mammoths back from extinction after thousands of years

Latest

Coral atlas maps the world’s reefs

international collaboration – including UQ, National Geographic, Arizona State University, Vulcan Philanthropic and satellite company Planet – has now completed digital mapping all of the world’s shallow coral reefs for the first time ever.
environment

The Allen Coral Atlas delivers the first-ever detailed, digital map of global coral for conservationists and ocean lovers the world over

MooLoo to the rescue

This undated handout photo received on September 13, 2021 from the Research Institute for Farm Animal Biology shows researcher Lindsay Matthews posing next to cows at a farm at an undisclosed location in New Zealand. - Matthews said that the idea of toilet training cows so their urine could be captured and treated first occurred to him when a radio host was interviewing him in 2007 and made a throwaway joke on the matter. (Photo by Handout / RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR FARM ANIMAL BIOLOGY / AFP) / TO GO WITH AFP STORY ----EDITORS NOTE ----RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE MANDATORY CREDIT " AFP PHOTO / RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR FARM ANIMAL BIOLOGY" NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
animals

Toddlers appreciate treats while toilet-training – and a new study has found calves like being rewarded for going in the right place too, clearing the path for lowering the climate cost of bovines

Have you heard the one about the Covid test?

The Royal ChildrenÕs Hospital will trial a new coronavirus testing method for kids over the coming weeks.
ItÕs a much less invasive but an equally effective test. 
The new device will sit at the base of a childÕs nose and collect any virus particles. Harry, 7, with the device.  Picture: Alex Coppel.
health

Getting a Covid-19 test is no joke, but it could become a lot more fun for kids thanks to a new Australian made testing device in the shape of moustaches and cat noses

Cheeky duck learns human insult

Rare and protected: The distinctive musk duck is a protected waterbird species in Victoria. Picture: supplied.
animals

Researchers got more than they bargained for when it came to studying old recordings of Ripper the Australian musk duck, who had learned to mimic a human in need of a swear jar

Space race continues on Mars

(FILES) In this file image released by NASA the drill hole from Perseverance’s second sample-collection attempt can be seen, in this composite of two images taken on September 1, 2021, by one of the rover’s navigation cameras. - NASA has confirmed that its Perseverance rover has succeeded in collecting its first rock sample on Mars. "I've got it!" the space agency tweeted in the early hours of September 6, 2021, alongside a photograph of a rock core slightly thicker than a pencil inside a sample tube. NASA said last week it thought it had accomplished the feat, but poorly-lit photographs taken by the rover meant that the team operating the mission were not certain whether the sample had stayed inside its tube. (Photo by Handout / various sources / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL-Caltech" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

NASA’s Mars rover Perseverance has successfully collected a rock sample from the Red Planet, while China follows up its own Mars mission with a new prototype

New class of planet could host life

A new type of planet, called hycean planets, has been identified as possible hosts of alien life.
space

They are covered by oceans and much bigger and hotter than Earth, but astronomers believe a new class of planet, called hycean planets, could be the key to finding alien life

Good moods from fresh foods

Healthy food for thought. Fresh fruit and vegetables consumed by early teens helps develop the brain apposed to unhealthy foods a study has found. Ella 11, goes to the top of the class when it comes to eating good food.                    Picture: David Caird
health

That yucky feeling after eating junk is your body telling you something – and now we know that foods high in sugar, fat and salt are harming your mental health too

Four-legged whale fossil found in Egypt

Paleontologists discover four-legged whale fossil, name it Phiomicetus anubis after Egypt's god of death
animals

The 43-million-year-old fossil of a fierce, four-legged whale species has been named after the ancient Egyptian god of death

Whale mums tour coast with calves

Southern  right whales, photographed in Fowlers bay on the Great Australian Bight over the period 21st -23 August 2021. There are 20 mother and calf pairs in the area, the calving season is in full spring. MUST CREDIT: EP Cruises- Fowlers Bay Whale Tours,
animals

Mother Nature keeps delivering gifts through lockdowns and restrictions, lifting spirits coast to coast with these whale wanderers

China’s Mars rover keeps roaming

This illustration shows what the rover should look like on Mars Credit: CHINA NATIONAL SPACE ADMINISTRATION
space

After successfully completing its first 90-day program, China’s red planet rover Zhurong is fully charged and ready to keep rolling

Teen takes flight in world record bid

British-Belgian pilot Zara Rutherford, 19, waves before taking off for a round-the-world trip in a light aircraft, in bid to become the youngest to fly solo round-the-world in Wevelgem on August 18, 2021. - Rutherford will fly a Shark ultralight, the world’s fastest light sport aircraf during her circumnavigation, which is set to take her up to three months. (Photo by JOHN THYS / AFP)
humanities

Teenage pilot Zara Rutherford has taken to the skies to inspire women of tomorrow to study STEM subjects today

Hotdogs land in hot water

A new study suggests that eating cheeseburgers can reduce your life expectancy by a few minutes each time. Pictured is Scout Parker, 2 and his brother Courtland, 4, enjoying a cheeseburger. Picture: David Swift
health

Ditching hotdogs and burgers from our diet could add up to extra time enjoying a healthy life, with a new study counting the minutes lost or gained from eating thousands of food items

Weird creatures that could be state’s official fossil

Finished reconstruction of extinct Australian megafauna, Palorchestes. One of a series of developmental illustrations. For Kids News
civics

Some states are adopting official fossils to join their traditional animal and flora emblems. See what relics are in the running to become the official fossil of Victoria

Giant panda delivers tiny cub

This handout photograph made available by Wildlife Reserves Singapore on August 15, 2021 shows female giant panda Jia Jia hodling her first panda cub, born on August 14, 2021 at an off-exhibit at River Safari in Singapore. (Photo by Handout / WILDLIFE RESERVES SINGAPORE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT “ AFP PHOTO / Wildlife Reserves Singapore” - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
animals

Chinese giant panda Kai Kai has become a mum in Singapore after a seven year effort, giving birth to the country’s first ever cub

The power of puppy love

HOLD FOR HERALD SUN, Speak to Manny before using Pebbles the cavoodle and Onni the parrot are great friends and hang out together.

Picture : Nicki Connolly
animals

Aussies have been feeling the love from the nation’s pets throughout the pandemic, a new study shows

Apes mind their manners with each other

EMBARGOED - DO NOT USE WITHOUT PERMISSION FROM THE DAILY TELEGRAPH PICTURE DESK - HOLDING UNTIL FRIDAY 20TH NOVEMBER-, Taronga Zoo's chimpanzee family recently welcomed the arrival of a female baby chimpanzee to mum Naomi with the name soon to be revealed. Picture: Toby Zerna Born on Wednesday at Taronga Zoo, chimpanzee infant Niambi was named after the Swahili word meaning ‘melody’ to reflect her unique call, which is already making rounds with the other chimps.
animals

New research has found that apes have a system of good manners that includes polite practices like saying hello and goodbye

Tusk tests reveal mammoth’s life journey

An illustration of an adult male woolly mammoth navigates a mountain pass in Arctic Alaska, 17,100 years ago. The image is produced from an original, life-size painting by paleo artist James Havens, which is housed at the University of Alaska Museum of the North.
animals

A woolly mammoth’s life and travels 17,000 years ago have been detailed for the first time after a study of one of its well preserved tusks. Welcome to Science Week!

NASA charts course of risky asteroid

(FILES) This NASA file image obtained August 11, 2020 shows an artist's rendering of the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft descending towards asteroid Bennu to collect a sample of the asteroid’s surface. - The big day has arrived for the American probe Osiris-Rex: after four years of travel, it will hit the asteroid Bennu on October 20, 2020 to pick up a few tens of grams of dust, a high-precision operation 320 million kilometers away from Earth . (Photo by Handout / NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /NASA/GODDARD/UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

NASA’s Osiris-Rex spacecraft is heading home after its mission to collect asteroid samples has helped scientists better understand one of the most hazardous space rocks in our solar system

China’s wandering elephants head home

PU'ER, CHINA - AUGUST 07: A herd of wild Asian elephants strolls through a village at Ning'er Hani and Yi Autonomous County on August 7, 2021 in Pu'er, Yunnan Province of China. (Photo by Wang Zhengpeng/VCG via Getty Images)
animals

After an epic journey followed by millions of fans around the world, China’s weary herd of wandering elephants is homeward bound ahead of World Elephant Day

Biggest Aussie pterosaur was a ‘fearsome beast’

Australia’s largest flying reptile has been uncovered, a pterosaur with an estimated seven-metre wingspan that soared like a dragon above the ancient, vast inland sea once covering much of outback Queensland., , University of Queensland PhD candidate Tim Richards, from the Dinosaur Lab in UQ’s School of Biological Sciences, led a research team that analysed a fossil of the creature’s jaw, discovered on Wanamara Country, near Richmond in North West Queensland. Picture University of Queensland
animals

Queensland palaeontologists say Australia’s largest flying reptile was a savage pterosaur with a taste – and the jaws – for the catch of the day

Global climate changing by degrees

This handout image obtained via the Nature Publishing website on April 24, 2018 shows melt ponds on the Arctic sea ice in the Central Arctic.   Sea ice traps large amounts of microplastics and transports them across the Arctic Ocean according to a study in Nature Communications this week. This finding demonstrates that sea ice can act as a temporary sink for microplastics, and confirms that large amounts may be released into the ocean as climate change leads to increased sea ice melting. / AFP PHOTO / Alfred Wegener Institut AND NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP / Stefan HENDRICKS / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NATURE PUBLISHING / ALFRED WEGENER INSTITUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS - NO ARCHIVE
environment

Experts say the international effort to limit global warming by keeping temperature rises to two degrees by 2060 is under pressure

Wanted: people to live like Martians

This photo provided by ICON and NASA in August 2021 shows a proposal for the Mars Dune Alpha habitat on Mars. To prepare for eventually sending astronauts to Mars, NASA began taking applications Friday, Aug. 6, 2021, for four people to live for a year in Mars Dune Alpha - a 1,700-square-foot Martian habitat, created by a 3D-printer, and inside a building at Johnson Space Center in Houston. The paid volunteers will work a simulated Martian exploration mission complete with spacewalks, limited communications back home, restricted food and resources and equipment failures. Image: ICON/NASA
space

NASA is looking for four people to spend a year in a Mars habitat created by a 3D printer here on Earth to help it understand the challenges astronauts will face when they blast off to the red planet

What is the Census all about?

CENSUS A 10x10 Collage of 100 unique faces, including people from a wide range of ethnicities, ages, and backgrounds, they are all from different walks of life.
explainers

The story of our nation is updated every five years at Census time – and what a strange chapter this one promises to be as people around Australia continue to live, work and learn through Covid

How Pluto lost its place as a planet

KIDS NEWS: Four images from New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were combined with color data from the spacecraft's Ralph instrument to create this enhanced color global view of Pluto. Picture: NASA.
space

It has been 15 years since Pluto was demoted to dwarf planet status, but some of us who grew up counting nine planets in our solar system are having a hard time letting go

Smelly theory behind the origin of Earth’s oxygen

grand prismatic spring, yellowstone national park, wyoming, united states (44?26'n, 110?39'w). situated on a volcanic plateau straddling the states of montana, idaho, and wyoming, yellowstone is the oldest national park in the world. created in 1872, it covers 9,000 km2 and contains the world?s largest concentration of geothermic sites. grand prismatic spring, 112 m in diameter, is the park?s largest hot pool. the colour spectrum after which it is named is caused by the presence of cyanobacteria, which grow faster in the hot water at the centre of the basin than at the periphery where the temperature is lower. yellowstone national park receives an average of 3 million visitors per year.
science

A new study suggests that as our planet slowed and daylight grew longer, one very smelly bacteria soaked up the light and started producing the oxygen needed for life on Earth

Dumped food costing Aussies the Earth

Food Waste
environment

A new study has lifted the bin lid on how much food we’re throwing away, as researchers call on Australians to stop the waste and stop destroying the planet

Australian turtles in serious peril from plastics

Sea turtles often confuse plastic with their usual foods, causing them to ingest the man-made material. Picture: Paulo Oliveira
animals

A worrying new study has found that the vast majority of turtles found off the east and west coasts of Australia have swallowed plastics – with juveniles most at risk

Girls do better without boys

L-r Sophie Orgill, 17, yr 12, Erin Ellis, 13, yr 7 and Isabella Osborn, 13, yr 8.
Research showing girls from single-sex schools are more mentally tough than boys and girls at co-ed schools. Picture: Jason Edwards
humanities

Girls from single-sex schools are mentally tougher than those who learn with boys, an international study has found

Ancient Egyptian shipwreck found in the Mediterranean Sea

2,200 year old shipwreck in Egypt. Picture: Egypt Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities
history

Buried beneath 5m of clay, archaeologists have made the incredible discovery of a 2200-year-old Egyptian shipwreck

Sydney’s clever cockatoos learn to open bin lids

KIDS NEWS: Canny cockatoos in Sydney star in a new scientific study showing off their sophisticated foraging skills. Picture: Dr Barbara Clump/Max Planck Institute.
animals

Sulphur-crested cockatoos have emerged as expert foragers, as a new international study tracks them opening bin lids all over Sydney using their tailor-made technique

How healthy is your breakfast?

Finn, 4, and Olive, 23 months, enjoy a health breakfast. TODDLERS who have a less healthy start to the day are more likely to be overweight by the time they start school, new research as revealed. Picture: Mark Stewart
health

A new Melbourne study shows that eating a healthy breakfast declines for children aged between 18 months and five – and researchers hope to learn why

How to kick off the Covid blues

Pictured at their home at Baulkham Hills in Sydney is Sharon Debevc with her two boys kids Mathew (12) and Danyel (14).
Sharon is a full time working mum juggling her job and homeschooling the kids.
Picture: Richard Dobson
health

The time has come to go easy on ourselves and each other – and there is still plenty of fun to set you free even while you are holed up at home

Space tourists hit new heights

VAN HORN, TEXAS - JULY 20: Blue Origin’s New Shepard crew (L-R) Oliver Daemen, Jeff Bezos, Wally Funk, and Mark Bezos pose for a picture after flying into space in the Blue Origin New Shepard on July 20, 2021 in Van Horn, Texas. Mr. Bezos and the crew that flew with him were the first human spaceflight for the company.   Joe Raedle/Getty Images/AFP == FOR NEWSPAPERS, INTERNET, TELCOS & TELEVISION USE ONLY ==
space

American billionaire Jeff Bezos has blasted into space on a reusable rocket that also carried his brother and the oldest and youngest people to visit space

Evidence of regrowth on the Great Barrier Reef

Two Scuba Divers swimming over Colorful Tropical Coral Reef, with two Pacific Double-saddle Butterflyfish (Chaetodon ulietensis), Big Longnose Butterflyfish (Forcipiger longirostris), Blue-spot Butterflyfish (Chaetodon plebeius), and a Saddled Butterflyfish (Chaetodon ephippium),  Great Barrier Reef, Coral Sea, South Pacific Ocean, Australia.  (Digital Composite)
credit: Jeff Hunter/Tourism QLD

escape
14 february 2021
savvy
environment

The Great Barrier Reef has gone through an important period of recovery, spared the impact of heatwaves and tropical cyclones over the past year

Solar tags to save koalas from bushfires

WEEKEND NEWSPAPERS SPECIAL. PLEASE CONTACT WEEKEND PIC EDITOR JEFF DARMANIN BEFORE PUBLISHING.   WWF is funding koala ear tags powered by a tiny solar panel the size of a 5c coin. When a fire approaches you can find the koalas and take them into care until it is safe to return them to the environment.  Takka the Koala with the solar ear tracker.
animals

Scientists are testing fitting koalas with mini solar panels that would allow them to be tracked and rescued from the path of bushfires

Aussie python celebrates World Snake Day

KIDS NEWS: Big Ronny the scrub python at Wild Life Sydney Zoo. Picture: supplied.
animals

Big Ronny the scrub python is in lockdown in Sydney, but the whopper reptile will ‘shake it off’ by shedding his skin just in time for World Snake Day

NASA finds four ‘teenage’ exoplanets

KIDS NEWS Pictured is TOI 1807 b, the only known planet orbiting the TOI 1807 star and the youngest example yet found of an “ultra-short period planet”, according to experts. Picture: supplied.
space

Four new ‘teenage’ planets have been found beyond our solar system by a team of international astrophysicists including from the University of Southern Queensland

‘Extinct’ native mouse found living on WA island

Pseudomys fieldi, a native Australian mouse from Shark Bay in Western Australian, is shown to be the same species as the previously extinct Gould’s mouse (Pseudomys gouldii). Source: Australian Wildlife Conservancy. Photographer: Wayne Lawler. For Kids News
animals

The Gould’s mouse hasn’t been seen on the Australian mainland for more than 160 years but a surprise discovery has revealed it is still living on an island off the coast of Western Australia

Boy genius plans for humans to live forever

Eleven year-old Belgian-Dutch student Laurent Simons poses in Amsterdam on July 6, 2021, after receiving his bachelor's degree in Physics from the University of Antwerp. (Photo by ROBIN VAN LONKHUIJSEN / ANP / AFP) / Netherlands OUT
science

A degree in quantum physics is nothing compared to the bold ambition of this child genius – just don’t call him ‘Young Einstein’

Billionaire blasts to edge of space

This handout photo courtesy Of Virgin Galactic shows Sir Richard Branson(C) and other Unity 22 crew members at zero gravity, viewed as they flew into space aboard a Virgin Galactic vessel, a voyage he described as the "experience of a lifetime" -- and one he hopes will usher in an era of lucrative space tourism at Spaceport America, near Truth and Consequences, New Mexico on July 11, 2021. - "Congratulations to all our wonderful team at Virgin Galactic for 17 years of hard, hard work to get us this far," he said during a live feed as the VSS Unity spaceship glided back to Spaceport America in New Mexico.It reached a peak altitude of around 53 miles (85 kilometers) -- beyond the boundary of space, according to the United States -- allowing the passengers to experience weightlessness and admire the Earth's curvature.The trip proceeded without drama, and touchdown occurred at around 9:40 am Mountain Time (1540 GMT), about an hour after take-off. (Photo by Patrick T. FALLON / Virgin Galactic / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /VIRGIN GALATIC/HANDOUT " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

Thrill-seeking billionaire Sir Richard Branson has reached space aboard his Virgin Galactic spacecraft in a mission that has brought space tourism a step closer

New ‘Dragon Man’ species found

A handout photo obtained on June 25, 2021 from EurekAlert! shows an illustration of a portrait of Dragon Man. - Scientists announced Friday that a skull discovered in Northeast China represents a newly discovered human species they have named Homo longi or "Dragon Man," and the lineage may replace Neanderthals as our closest relatives. (Photo by CHUANG Zhao / EUREKALERT! / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /BYLINE " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO /EurekAlert ! / Chuang Zhao" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
history

The human species’ family tree has sprouted a new branch, with the discovery in China of the ‘Dragon Man’, thought by experts to be a nearer relative to Homo sapiens than Neanderthals

Black hole swallows neutron star

Artist’s impression of a neutron star and black hole about to merge. Credit: Carl Knox, OzGrav-Swinburne University
space

Astronomers have for the first time witnessed the collision of a black hole and a neutron star, with Australian scientists playing a leading role in the discovery

Meet Australia’s frog whisperer

Frog whisper feature

Professor Michael Mahony holds a Green and Golden Bell Frog as PhD candidate and research assistant Rebecca Sceto looks on inside a laboratory at the University of Newcastle, Australia, June 4, 2021. REUTERS/James Redmayne
animals

Professor Michael Mahony loves talking to frogs – and loves it even more when they talk back. But he fears his amphibian friends are at increasing risk of falling silent

Can ET see us from space?

ET character and child actor Henry Thomas in a scene from the film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.
space

A new astronomical study has flipped the practice of looking out at our galaxy by asking who might be looking in

Caterpillar venom could be used to make medicine

The caterpillar of the mottled cup moth, Doratifera  vulnerans, which is commonly found in eastern Australia, has been found by University of Queensland researchers to have a complex venom that could be used to make medicines and pest control. Picture: Jiayi Jin, University of Queensland
animals

It might deliver a nasty sting, but the venom of this common Australian caterpillar could be used to fight diseases in humans and livestock

Lego turns plastic bottles into bricks

EXCLUSIVE: LEGO has released a prototype for its new sustainable brick made from recycled bottles.
environment

Australian children could soon be playing with Lego made from recycled plastic bottles as the toy giant looks to make its famous bricks better for the environment

How do astronauts clean clothes in space?

NASA astronaut Shannon Walker - wife of Adelaide’s own spacewalker Andy Thomas - departed for the International Space Station in November And took a Crows guernsey with her .  Picture: NASA
space

Not even astronauts can avoid the housework forever, as NASA announces plans for a dirty laundry overhaul aboard the International Space Station

Great Barrier Reef headed for endangered list

The Far Northern Reefs of the Great Barrier Reef are still in excellent condition.
environment

The United Nations has recommended the Great Barrier Reef be listed as 'in danger' but the federal government is fighting the move

Astronauts install new solar panels in space

KIDS NEWS French astronaut Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) works to complete the installation of a roll out solar array on the International Space Station, June 20, 2021. Picture: NASA.
space

It's been a busy week in space as astronauts at the International Space Station install new solar panels and three Chinese astronauts step aboard China’s module for a historic three-month stay

Ancient fish species lives to 100

(FILES) In this file photograph taken on March 12, 2019, shows a coelacanth during its restoration process at the Museum d'Histoire Naturelle's (French National Museum of Natural History) taxidermy workshop in Paris. - The endangered coelacanth, a "prehistoric" fish species, is far more vulnerable than previously thought, according to a study by marine biologists published on June 17, 2021. They found that Latimeria chalimnae, sometimes referred to as a "living fossil" and found in the waters of the Indian Ocean around the Comoros, lives five times longer than previously thought. It also reproduces at a very late age, over 50 years, a feature that puts it at risk of being fished out before it can perpetuate the species. (Photo by Christophe ARCHAMBAULT / AFP)
animals

First it turned up alive after being thought to have gone extinct with the dinosaurs. Now the coelacanth has surprised again, with research showing it lives to the ripe old age of 100

Students test sea rubbish removal with robots

Westminster School Year 7 students Ashwin and Axel guide one of their prototype Sphero Bolt Driven Water Collection Devices watched by Anna and Aijay in the schools pool Thursday ,June,3,2021.Picture Mark Brake
environment

Year 7 students in SA have begun testing robotic rubbish collectors in the school pool, with their sights set on one day cleaning up waste-filled water worldwide

Raining spiders after Victorian floods

Longford Spiderweb Ballooning after flooding in the area. Picture: Lotje McDonald Photography (MUST CREDIT)
animals

Despite headlines of an ‘arachnid apocalypse’ and startling images of cobwebs blanketing country Victoria, locals and experts alike are mesmerised by the spiders’ ingenious survival technique

Robot lizards solve prey puzzle

Draco volans, the common flying dragon on the tree in Tangkoko National Park, Sulawesi, is a species of lizard endemic to Southeast Asia. lizard in wild nature, beautiful colorful lizard
animals

Why do predators sometimes overlook a seemingly easy meal in the wild? Australian scientists have answered the question with the help of robotic lizards

China’s wandering elephants become global stars

A migrating herd of elephants graze near Shuanghe Township, Jinning District of Kunming city in the Yunnan Province of southwestern China. Already famous at home, China's wandering elephants are now becoming international stars. Major global media, including satellite news stations, news papers and wire services are chronicling the herd's more-than year-long, 500 km trek from their home in a wildlife reserve in mountainous southwest Yunnan province to the outskirts of the provincial capital of Kunming. (Yunnan Forest Fire Brigade via AP
animals

After more than a year on the move, the antics of a Chinese herd of elephants are proving irresistible to social and world media

Dinos illustrate Covid challenge

Mark Knight cartoon for Kids News
health

What does the age of the dinosaurs have in common with our modern coronavirus challenge? Mark Knight explains why he combined the two in his latest cartoon for Kids News

Meet Australia’s largest dinosaur

The giant of the Outback has been identified as a new dinosaur genus and species – Australotitan cooperensis, the Southern titan! This dinosaur is a new gigantic titanosaur, a plant-eating dinosaur group that represent the largest animals that walked on earth.  It reached a similar size to the world’s dinosaur giants found in South America, marking Australia’s first entry into the world’s dinosaur giants
animals

What is longer than a basketball court and taller than a B-double truck? Australia’s newest and biggest dino, Australotitan cooperensis, nicknamed Cooper

Squid and water bears blast off into space

Resembling miniature underwater caterpillars, tardigrades boast teeny claws at the end of their legs, hence their "water bear"  nickname.
space

Five thousand water bears and 128 glow-in-the-dark baby squid have left Earth aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket bound for the science labs of the International Space Station

Radioactive rhino horns to the rescue?

Scientists in South Africa have injected radioactive material into the horns of two rhinos in a novel effort to save the species from poachers., James Larkin, a professor at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg and an expert in radiation protection, said that the stable isotopes used were harmless and that he “doesn’t want to kill anyone” with the infusion: “We just want to use the natural reticence towards radioactive material to decrease demand for rhino horn and also make it easier , From sourcE:, https://www.facebook.com/Rhisotope/
animals

A radical – indeed radioactive – scientific solution has begun in South Africa to save the rhino species by deterring poachers

Say goodbye to needles with vaccine patch

The UQ research team, featuring (foreground, L-R) Dr Chris McMillan, Dr David Muller, (background, L-R) Dr Alberto Amarilla, Dr Naphak Modhiran Ortiz and Ms Jovin Choo.
science

We could soon be giving ourselves Covid vaccines without the need for a doctor, nurse or needle, thanks to a “game changing” discovery by Australian scientists

Teen climate warriors have their day in court

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA- News Wire photos MAY 27 2021- (LR)  Laura Kirwan (17), Izzy Raj-Seppings (14), Ava Princi (17) and Liv Heaton posing for a photo out the front of the Federal law court on Phillip st in Sydney. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Adam Yip
environment

Aussie teenage climate activists have lost their court bid to stop a NSW mine expansion, but ‘duty of care’ ruling declared a win

NASA releases stunning view of Milky Way

Threads of superheated gas and magnetic fields are weaving a tapestry of energy at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. A new image of this new cosmic masterpiece was made using a giant mosaic of data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the MeerKAT radio telescope in South Africa.

Picture: NASA

Source: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/images/magnetized-threads-weave-spectacular-galactic-tapestry.html
space

An astronomer has spent a year working from home during lockdowns to create a composite image of our galaxy, including billions of stars and countless black holes

Why some sounds drive us crazy

naughty children
science

Researchers from Newcastle University in the UK discover a link in brain processes that could help people who can’t stand certain sounds

How airport sniffer dogs could detect Covid-19

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA - SEPTEMBER 18: English Springer Spaniel Floki, who is 1 of 2 South Australian dogs is taking part the Covid-19 detection training at the University of Adelaide on September 18, 2020 in Adelaide, Australia. Researchers from the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences at the University of Adelaide are working to train sniffer dogs to detect COVID-19 in people. The Adelaide study is part of an international research effort aimed at training COVID-19 detection dogs who could be used to screen people for coronavirus such as at airports, hospitals or quarantine facilities. The dogs taking part in the study at the University of Adelaide are being trained to pick the positive COVID-19 sweat sample from a line-up of samples, using positive reinforcement in the form of play with their favourite toy for each correct answer. Early results also show dogs trained in this way are able to identify infected individuals prior to the development of symptoms, or in those who are otherwise asymptomatic. (Photo by Kelly Barnes/Getty Images)
animals

Sniffer dogs are a step closer to being used in Australian airports to identify Covid-19 carriers after successful first trials

Would you wash with snail slime soap?

French artisan Damien Desrocher is making soap from snail slime. For Kids News. Image: Reuters
animals

One French artisan believes snail slime has anti-ageing properties that make it perfect for his boutique beauty soap

Kids putting backpacks on bees for science

A bee wearing a backpack
science

Citizen scientist school students are playing an important role in an innovative research project aimed at understanding and protecting the world’s valuable bee population

Clever ads no cure for vaccine complacency

Mark Knight's covid vaccine cartoon
health

Mark Knight was wondering what it would take to encourage a reluctant public to front up for Covid-19 vaccinations when the answer presented itself in the form of another outbreak

New dinosaur named in Mexico

A new species of dinosaur called Tlatolophus galorum has been discovered in Mexico. Image from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH)
animals

Eight years after the first of its fossilised remains were found in Mexico, palaeontologists confirm a new species of crested dinosaur

Earth’s scorching desert heat tops 80C

Sunset in Sonoran Desert, near Phoenix. Picture: iStock

Doc Holiday, escape
weather

Death Valley is no longer the hottest place on Earth, according to scientists who have found two even hotter places. We look at how Australia’s hottest places compare

Get set for a very special lunar eclipse

A total eclipse of the Moon seen from Tasmania on 8 October 2014. During that eclipse, the Moon remained close to the inner edge of Earth’s shadow. On Wednesday it will be even closer. PHOTO: Martin George
explainers

The first lunar eclipse of 2021 is going to happen on May 26. This is going to be a super lunar event with a supermoon, a lunar eclipse and a red blood moon all at once. Here’s how it happens

Antarctic ice shelf calves massive iceberg

An enormous iceberg has calved from the western side of the Ronne Ice Shelf, lying in the Weddell Sea, in Antarctica. The iceberg, dubbed A-76, measures around 4320 sq km in size – currently making it the largest berg in the world.

Picture: ESA
geography

An iceberg 170km long, 25km wide and the largest of its kind in the world has broken off Antarctica. It formed as scientists reported the previous largest iceberg had broken up and melted

World Bee Day creates buzz

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MAY 18: Bees are seen on a honeycomb cell  at the BEE Lab hives at The University of Sydney on May 18, 2021 in Sydney, Australia. The BEE Lab researches the behaviour, ecology and evolution of bees combining work in both the lab and the field. Australian bee populations were decimated by the Black Summer bushfires at the end of 2019 and early 2020 with around 2.5 billion bees and 10,000 commercial beehives destroyed in New South Wales and Victoria alone. Increased rainfall over the last year, along with concerted efforts by Australian apiarists has seen bee populations recover in 2021. Australia has an estimated 2,000 species of native bee, along with the European honey bee, which according to the NSW Department of Primary Industries plays an important role in large-scale agricultural pollination services and provide beeswax and honey to the domestic and export market. With bee populations under significant threat globally from extreme climate events, destruction of natural habitat, intensive farming practices, pests and disease, World Bee Day on 20 May aims to increase awareness and highlight the significance of bees and other pollinators to ensure food security, biodiversity and maintain a healthy ecosystem. (Photo by Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images)
environment

We all know bees make honey, but their importance in Australia extends far beyond producing a beloved breakfast spread

Aussie coins encourage conservation in kids

WEEKEND TELEGRAPHS SPECIAL. MUST TALK WITH PIC ED JEFF DARMANIN BEFORE PUBLISHING - Pictured at home in Manly today is Iggy 10 and Atticus Jenkins 6, with Australia Posts Great Aussie Coin Hunt collectables. Picture: Tim Hunter.
animals

Zookeeper and bushfire survivor Chad Staples says showcasing native creatures in the Great Aussie Coin Hunt is “so important” for conservation awareness

Hank the cat worn out by mouse plague

Embargoed for Monday 17 May 2021. Amy Payten from Gulgong took this image of her 9 year old cat called Hank with a mouse sitting on it. Must Credit her daughter Holly Schink
environment

The mouse plague overrunning eastern Australia has tormented those in its path for so long even a usually energetic ginger cat called Hank no longer bothers to chase the pesky rodents

China lands probe and rover on Mars

This handout photograph released on February 5, 2021 by the China National Space Administration (CNSA) shows an image of Mars captured by China's Mars probe Tianwen-1. (Photo by - / China National Space Administration / AFP) / -----EDITORS NOTE --- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / China National Space Adminstration " - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

A rover called Zhurong has joined Perseverance and others on the red planet after China became the first country to carry out an orbiting, landing and roving operation in its first mission to Mars

Trillions of Brood X cicadas about to hatch

A periodical cicada nymph clings to a tree branch on May 11, 2021 in Greenbelt, Maryland. - Some are waiting for their arrival with trepidation, others are curious what they might taste like: Americans are swapping tips on how best to weather the storm when billions of cicadas soon emerge after 17 years underground. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP)
explainers

Cicadas are about to emerge from the soil in a hatch so big, noisy and incredible the whole world has been eagerly waiting for it to happen. Kids News researches whether this is as scary as it seems

NASA probe ‘touches the Sun’

An artist's impression of the Parker Solar Probe approaching the Sun. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL/Steve Gribben
space

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe has broken its own record as the fastest man-made object in history as its speed brings it closer and closer to the Sun.

Sniffer bees busy on COVID test training

Enjoy the spring! Everything is blooming and the bees are diligently flying from flower to flower. I would like to share this spring feelings with you and have taken this picture for you.
science

Scientists have trained bees to identify COVID-19 in test samples, providing results almost instantly instead of waiting hours for regular test results to come through

Heaviest moth in the world found at primary school

A giant moth the size of a rat was found by a tradie during the build of the Mt Cotton State School in Redland, Queensland. 
Picture:  Mt Cotton State School Facebook.
animals

Builders have found a giant wood moth as big as two adult human fists while working at a Queensland school, sparking a creative writing story in which the teacher is eaten by moths

World’s widest plane aces test flight

KIDS NEWS: The Stratolaunch Roc aircraft, a six-engine jet with the world's longest wingspan, completed its second tsr flight, Thursday, April 29, 2021 in Mojave, California. Picture: AP Photo/Matt Hartman.
space

Two years after its first flight, the gigantic Stratolaunch aircraft took to the skies for a second time above the Mojave Desert in the US.

Parrot flies back from brink of extinction

animals

Five years ago, scientists faced the prospect of the critically endangered orange-bellied parrot “going extinct right in front of us”, but now those same scientists are grinning from ear to ear

Some good news for endangered Sumatran rhino

SUNDAY ESCAPE. WILDLIFE WISHLIST. Sumatran rhino. Picture: Taronga Conservation Society Australia
animals

With only an estimated 80 Sumatran rhinos left in the wild, the results of a new study deliver welcome hope for the survival of the species.

Weird fish makes comeback in Murray River

A lamprey fish close up. Picture: Department for Environment and Water South Australia
environment

Scientists have found a spooky-looking, bloodsucking, critically endangered native fish in record numbers in the Murray River system, which is great news for the environment and lamprey fish

Creepy-crawlies on the menu

Edible insects are high in protein, vitamins and other macronutrients.  For spread of bread, desserts etc. (Image: Boris Ceko)
health

Bugs like witchetty grubs, bogong moths and green tree ants could soon be on Australian dinner plates under a plan to grow our edible insect industry

Just three per cent of Earth untouched by humans

ESCAPE: Toucan, Peru - uniworld, peru, amazon, rainforest, nature, wildlife, animals, toucan, Bird. Picture: Uniworld
environment

A new scientific study has found as little as 3 per cent of the world’s land surfaces are still home to their full range of native species and remain unspoilt by human activity

Group spends 40 days in French cave for experiment

Members of the French team that participated in the "Deep Time" study pose for a photo after exiting the Lombrives Cave in Ussat les Bains, France, Saturday, April 24, 2021. After 40 days in voluntary isolation, 15 people participating in a scientific experiment have emerged from a vast cave in southwestern France. Eight men and seven women lived in the dark, damp depths of the Lombrives cave in the Pyrenees to help researchers understand how people adapt to drastic changes in living conditions and environments. They had no clocks, no sunlight and no contact with the world above. (AP Photo/Renata Brito)
science

Imagine 40 days in a cave without light, clocks or technology. That’s what a group of 15 volunteers has done for a scientific experiment in France

Fitbits for Phillip Island penguins

Ever thought your other half wasn't pulling their weight in the parenting role? Well it appears that Little Penguins have the same issue! A new paper published in the International Society for Behavioural Ecology's journal, shows some individual penguins work harder than their partners to feed their chicks. The study is part of joint research between Australian and French scientists. According to one of the paper's authors, Phillip Island Nature Parks' Penguin Biologist, Dr Andre Chiaradia, the findings come as something of a surprise, as it was previously thought both parents contributed equally to raising chicks.
animals

Phillip Island’s little penguins are small but mighty adaptable, according to a new scientific study using custom-made ‘fitbits’.

Oxygen extracted from thin Mars air

This NASA photo shows the Perseverance Mars rover in a selfie with the Ingenuity helicopter, seen here about 13 feet (3.9 meters) from the rover, on April 6, 2021, the 46th Martian day, or sol, of the mission and taken by the WATSON (Wide Angle Topographic Sensor for Operations and eNgineering) camera. - NASA is targeting no earlier than Sunday, April 11, for Ingenuity Mars Helicopter’s first attempt at powered, controlled flight on another planet. A livestream confirming Ingenuity’s first flight is targeted to begin around 3:30 a.m. EDT Monday, April 12. (Photo by Handout / NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

NASA has achieved another first in its mission to Mars, extracting breathable oxygen from the Red Planet’s atmosphere which is made up mostly of carbon dioxide

Billions of T-rex roamed the Earth

Chris Pratt faces a rampaging T-Rex dinosaur in a scene from film Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
animals

If it scares you to think about one bus-sized T-rex rampaging across the land, what about 2.5 billion of them? New tyrannosaur research has suggested there were 20,000 alive at a time during their reign

Kids quizzed by app to gain phone access

Alyssa Elnekave, 13, using the new app 1Question, at home in Rozelle, today.
Her parents, Ann and Issac Elnekave, have invented an app called 1Question and
1Questian Parent.
The app forces kids to answer maths questions to unlock apps and games on their phones. 
Picture:Justin Lloyd
technology

Two Australian parents have invented an app that asks kids a maths or English problem before they can unlock their phones.

This is what a spider web sounds like

(GERMANY OUT) Gartenkreuzspinne (Araneus diadematus) - European garden spider (Araneus diadematus) (Photo by Alfred Schauhuber/McPhoto/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
science

Scientists have used artificial intelligence to study spiders and their webs to create eerie music from the vibrations. Listen to what a spider web sounds like

Mars helicopter takes off on first flight

This NASA photo was taken after the first flight of NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter — and the first powered, controlled flight on another planet,  captured by Mastcam-Z, a pair of zoomable cameras aboard NASA's Perseverance Mars rover, on April 19, 2021. - Flying in a controlled manner on Mars is far more difficult than flying on Earth. Mars has significant gravity (about one-third that of Earth's), but its atmosphere is just 1 percent as dense as Earth's at the surface. Stitched together from multiple images, the mosaic is not white balanced; instead, it is displayed in a preliminary calibrated version of a natural color composite, approximately simulating the colors of the scene that we would see if we were there viewing it ourselves. (Photo by Handout / NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/ASU / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/ASU/HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING - NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
space

NASA’s experimental helicopter Ingenuity rose into the thin air above the dusty red surface of Mars on Monday, achieving the first powered flight by an aircraft on another planet

Earth safe from asteroid hit

An illustration of a large asteroid impacting Earth. An impact this large would result in the extinction of most all life on Earth. Earth texture maps courtesy of NASA - source http
space

An asteroid that had threatened to crash into Earth has been removed from NASA’s ‘risk list’ for at least the next 100 years

Leeches invade NSW homes after floods

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 21: A leech slithers along the ground in Windsor on March 21, 2021 in Sydney, Australia. Evacuation warnings are in place for parts of Western Sydney as floodwaters continue to rise. (Photo by Jenny Evans/Getty Images)
animals

The recent floods in NSW have brought more than just record rainfall – and bloodthirsty leeches are loving it

Supermoon helps free stuck ship

A picture released by Egypt's Suez Canal Authority on March 29, 2021, shows a man waving the Egyptian flag after Panama-flagged MV 'Ever Given' container ship was fully dislodged from the banks of the Suez. - The ship was refloated and the Suez Canal reopened, sparking relief almost a week after the huge container ship got stuck and blocked a major artery for global trade. Salvage crews have been working around the clock ever since the accident which has been blamed on high winds and poor visibility during a sandstorm. (Photo by - / SUEZ CANAL AUTHORITY / AFP)
geography

The stars, sun, Earth and moon all aligned in Egypt this week, with the year’s first supermoon bringing the high tide needed to shift the massive ship blocking the Suez Canal

Surprise just-in-time find of tiny native fish

EMBARGO SUNDAY 28 MARCH: NO THE AUSTRALIAN/NO NEWS.COM/NO SKY NEWS - ONE TIME USE ONLY -  Southern Purple Spotted Gudgeon (Mogurnda adspersa) just captured in field is held by researcher Amy Russelll (from the North Catchment Managment Authorty before being measured and released back.
Captive (taken in-field) and under the supervision of researchers.
Reedy Lake, Kerang, Victoria, Australia.
November, 2020.  MUST CREDIT PHOTOGRAPHER:  DOUG GIMESY
animals

The future looks bright for the southern purple spotted gudgeon fish, a tiny native species twice declared regionally extinct and this time found in a lake just two days before it was to be drained

Meet Nemo, the peacock spider

A newly discovered species of peacock spider with a bright orange face has been named Nemo after the clownfish featured in the hit movie Finding Nemo. Picture: Museum Victoria
animals

A newly discovered species of peacock spider with a bright orange face has been named after the clownfish from hit animated movie Finding Nemo

Aussie Dish to support Moon landings

04/07/2019. CSIRO's Parkes Radio Telescope, situated outside the town of Parkes in Western NSW. Ahead of the 50th anniversary of the historic Apollo 11 Moon landing. Pictures received by the telescope of Neil Armstrong's first steps on the lunar surface of the moon were broadcast around the world on 21 July 1969. Britta Campion / The Australian
space

Australia’s Parkes telescope will be part of one of the first commercial lunar landings, probably this year. The 64m telescope is valuable for spacecraft tracking due to its large dish surface